Today is the Tenth Anniversary of Black Wednesday

If you are a trans person, ten years ago today you were handed proof positive of what Barney Frank and the Human Right Scampaign think of you (and St. Barney had yet to give his “Oz” speech!)

A month earlier, the (talking) head of HRC, Joe Solmonese, went before the Southern Comfort Conference in Atlanta and committed an act of criminal fraud.  He told trans people that not only would HRC not support an ENDA that did not include trans people, HRC would actively oppose any such bill.  There is no reason to believe that HRC never profited financially from what we now know to have been a lie; some people either joined HRC or donated to HRC based on what Solmonese himself knew, as he was saying it, was not true.

HRC never had any intention of actively opposing what happened ten years ago today: The first-ever trans-inclusive ENDA was thrown in the garbage and replaced by what was then just the latest in a long line of bills that, had it passed, would have established a federal right for lesbians, gays and bisexuals to discriminate against trans people in the employment arena.

The back of the program book that SCC attendees who saw Solmonese’s criminal act contained an image of an African-American trans person and a text blurb.

The image snap of it I have is not very high quality…

BlackWednesdaySCCImage

…but TransAdvocate addressed the SolmoneseScam.  That image?

It reads:

I Am HRC

NOTE: At the time of the 2007 SCC (and of Black Wednesday for that matter), NO trans people were being permitted to be gainfully employed at HRC. A handful of token trans men had (including one double-token) and immediately after the ENDA Crisis of 2007, HRC hastily found a trans woman with no connection whatsoever to trans activism (but plenty to the worlds of religion and militarism) to be its first token trans woman employee.  But at the time of the 2007 SCC and of Black Wednesday, the organization that self-described as it did in the paragraph below had NEVER – in what was then 27 years of existence – been able to lower itself to hire a trans woman for any position doing anything.  (The Pipeline Report was a revelation to no one who has been paying attention; it was just a pustule of truth left momentarily uncovered by all artifacts of designer clothing.  And, BTW…has the Washington Blade ever run an item on it?)

The Human Rights Campaign and its grassroots force of 700,000 members and supporters are working every day to achieve our vision of a fair and equal country. By working with Americans of all race, classes and backgrounds, we are committed to improving the lives of all gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

The Human Rights Campaign salutes the 2007 Southern Comfort Conference!

Joe Solmonese thanked Mara Keisling of The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) for the work she’s done. Mara’s received much of the credit for the progress that the transgender community has accomplished. If transgender people are written out of ENDA or the Matthew Shepard Act, I really have to call into question what push NCTE has. How far have we come?

I’ll ask again. are we one community? If we are removed from either the Matthew Shepard Act or ENDA and HRC does not lobby AGAINST PASSAGE of either bill without inclusion, we are not one community. HRC, NCTE, and others have acted, signaled, and said we are one. Now is crunch time. Am I really HRC? We shall see.

We saw.

Solmonese’s successor, Chad Griffin, gave a vague apology at SCC in 2014.

But until HRC pays reparations for the damage that it had done to the trans community in general – and, more specifically, for the blacklisting of trans activists who have refused to accept HRC’s revealed wisdom – the organization is just one more unpunished corporate criminal.

Its 2017.

HRC has bestowed gainful employment upon a handful more trans people – including some trans women – since 2007.  But until reparations and real apologies for specific acts of aggression are made, trans people who allow themselves to be part of HRC in any way are not advocates for their own people.

They’re collaborators.

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Has the Future Already Been Forgotten? A Post-2007 Transgender Legal History Told Through the Eyes of the Late, (Rarely) Great Employment Non-Discrimination Act

The article is now available on the website of the William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law.  Please read before all of the pro-HRC revisionist crap is shoveled into officially-approved discourse this fall.

Has the Future Already Been Forgotten

2007: Ten Years Ago, Ten Years After

Yes, posts have been sparse of late.

This is one of multiple reasons:
Has the Future Already Been Forgotten

The full text of this article is not yet available on the website of the William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law.  However, I will link to it when it becomes available.

Ten Years Ago Tomorrow: H.R. 2015

Discuss.

EB10 - 0001

Tim Campbell, RIP

The following appeared in 1976 in Vol. 6, Issue No. 23 of Lee Brewster’s Drag magazine:

Drag - 0623 - 01 Drag - 0623 - 02 Drag - 0623 - 03 Drag - 0623 - 04 Drag - 0623 - 05 Drag - 0623 - 06 Drag - 0623 - 07 Drag - 0623 - 08

There was no byline.

For many years I presumed it had been authored by Brewster and/or one of the other folks directly involved with Drag.

A little over two years ago I ran across the original source of the text that appeared in that issue of Drag.  Under a slightly different headline (“Equal Rights for Transexuals, Transvestites”) it was an article that appeared in the February 5, 1976 issue of the Minnesota Daily, the University of Minnesota’s newspaper.

And it had a byline.

The author was Tim Campbell.

He died in December at the age of 76.

There are several obituaries for him out in internet-land, but I’ll link only to the one in Lavender magazine.

And I link to it because Campbell wrote that one himself – not because of any particular trans aspect to it. He had his own priorities as to what he wanted people to think about when he died; he had that right (he wasn’t the host of a national primetime news program purporting to provide an objective view of history.) Having been a cohort of Jack Baker and Mike McConnell back in Minnesota in the 1970s, he not surprisingly saw last year’s gay marriage victory as a really big deal (the Baker-McConnell marriage being something he blogged about quite a bit.)

But there is one other thing I hope folks will remember even if he did not want to focus on it. He wasn’t just one of the early pro-marriage folks. And he wasn’t just the publisher, throughout the 1980s, of the GLC Voice newspaper. He also played a key role in bringing forth the trans-inclusive language that he wrote of in that Drag / Minnesota Daily piece.

Allan Spear, who Campbell did not think very highly of, did eventually begin introducing trans-inclusive legislation in Minnesota and was the Senate author of the bill that in 1993 became the first statewide trans-inclusive civil rights law.  But that wouldn’t have happened without the agitation at the state legislature in 1975 – which led to much in the way of hard feelings between the inclusionists and the incrementalists but also led to the trans-inclusion language being added to the then-gay-only Minneapolis Civil Rights Ordinance.

The fortieth anniversary of that occurred four days after Campbell’s death on Dec. 26.

That’s worth remembering.

In Houston, Vote for HERO Tomorrow

It will piss off a TERF.

That by itself is worthwhile, though its also simply the right thing to do.

On this Week’s Episode of ‘Synonyms for Texas’…

douchetastic buffoonery

Actually, according to former Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, that’s a synonym for Texans owner Bob McNair – or at least what he’s been up to (because he clearly hasn’t been up to putting together a competent team.)

It was with some puzzlement that I read the recent story about your donation to a political group opposing the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (“HERO”), a measure seeking to protect Houstonians from sexual orientation and gender identity-based discrimination.

“Surely,” I said to myself, “one of the NFL’s thirty-two owners, businessmen with more accumulated wealth than most third world nations and completely vested in the well-being of the society that afforded them such success … surely this man could not be a pants-on-head, cowhumping glue-huffer stupid enough to buy in on clearly outdated ideals of bigotry and intolerance?”

Sadly, however, it appears I must hide my livestock, because the facts do not lie. You have, indeed, donated $10,000 to a cause whose sole purpose is to denigrate a specific group of American citizens

And those are just the opening three paragraphs of Kluwe’s open letter to McNair.

I rarely favorably quote Dan Savage, but this is an exception to the rule.

Kluwe’s letter?

It gets better.

Muuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuch better.