2007: Ten Years Ago, Ten Years After

Yes, posts have been sparse of late.

This is one of multiple reasons:
Has the Future Already Been Forgotten

The full text of this article is not yet available on the website of the William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law.  However, I will link to it when it becomes available.

Ten Years Ago Tomorrow: H.R. 2015

Discuss.

EB10 - 0001

Tim Campbell, RIP

The following appeared in 1976 in Vol. 6, Issue No. 23 of Lee Brewster’s Drag magazine:

Drag - 0623 - 01 Drag - 0623 - 02 Drag - 0623 - 03 Drag - 0623 - 04 Drag - 0623 - 05 Drag - 0623 - 06 Drag - 0623 - 07 Drag - 0623 - 08

There was no byline.

For many years I presumed it had been authored by Brewster and/or one of the other folks directly involved with Drag.

A little over two years ago I ran across the original source of the text that appeared in that issue of Drag.  Under a slightly different headline (“Equal Rights for Transexuals, Transvestites”) it was an article that appeared in the February 5, 1976 issue of the Minnesota Daily, the University of Minnesota’s newspaper.

And it had a byline.

The author was Tim Campbell.

He died in December at the age of 76.

There are several obituaries for him out in internet-land, but I’ll link only to the one in Lavender magazine.

And I link to it because Campbell wrote that one himself – not because of any particular trans aspect to it. He had his own priorities as to what he wanted people to think about when he died; he had that right (he wasn’t the host of a national primetime news program purporting to provide an objective view of history.) Having been a cohort of Jack Baker and Mike McConnell back in Minnesota in the 1970s, he not surprisingly saw last year’s gay marriage victory as a really big deal (the Baker-McConnell marriage being something he blogged about quite a bit.)

But there is one other thing I hope folks will remember even if he did not want to focus on it. He wasn’t just one of the early pro-marriage folks. And he wasn’t just the publisher, throughout the 1980s, of the GLC Voice newspaper. He also played a key role in bringing forth the trans-inclusive language that he wrote of in that Drag / Minnesota Daily piece.

Allan Spear, who Campbell did not think very highly of, did eventually begin introducing trans-inclusive legislation in Minnesota and was the Senate author of the bill that in 1993 became the first statewide trans-inclusive civil rights law.  But that wouldn’t have happened without the agitation at the state legislature in 1975 – which led to much in the way of hard feelings between the inclusionists and the incrementalists but also led to the trans-inclusion language being added to the then-gay-only Minneapolis Civil Rights Ordinance.

The fortieth anniversary of that occurred four days after Campbell’s death on Dec. 26.

That’s worth remembering.

In Houston, Vote for HERO Tomorrow

It will piss off a TERF.

That by itself is worthwhile, though its also simply the right thing to do.

On this Week’s Episode of ‘Synonyms for Texas’…

douchetastic buffoonery

Actually, according to former Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, that’s a synonym for Texans owner Bob McNair – or at least what he’s been up to (because he clearly hasn’t been up to putting together a competent team.)

It was with some puzzlement that I read the recent story about your donation to a political group opposing the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (“HERO”), a measure seeking to protect Houstonians from sexual orientation and gender identity-based discrimination.

“Surely,” I said to myself, “one of the NFL’s thirty-two owners, businessmen with more accumulated wealth than most third world nations and completely vested in the well-being of the society that afforded them such success … surely this man could not be a pants-on-head, cowhumping glue-huffer stupid enough to buy in on clearly outdated ideals of bigotry and intolerance?”

Sadly, however, it appears I must hide my livestock, because the facts do not lie. You have, indeed, donated $10,000 to a cause whose sole purpose is to denigrate a specific group of American citizens

And those are just the opening three paragraphs of Kluwe’s open letter to McNair.

I rarely favorably quote Dan Savage, but this is an exception to the rule.

Kluwe’s letter?

It gets better.

Muuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuch better.

Gee, I Wish I’d Said That in 2011

A transgender person can’t be discriminated against in hiring at a restaurant but they can be denied entry.

…about both Maryland and Massachusetts.

Oh, wait….

The Imperative: Making Sure That Sweet Cakes’ Own Fake Narrative Doesn’t Become Accepted as Fact

You know Sweet Cakes, right?

Owned and operated by the Kleins?

The controversy began in January 2013 when the Kleins turned away Rachel Cryer and Laurel Bowman from their bakery, saying that providing a cake for their wedding would have violated their Christian beliefs against same-sex marriage.

In August 2013, the women complained to the state Bureau of Labor and Industries. The agency conducted an investigation and in January 2014 brought charges that the Kleins had unlawfully discriminated against the couple because of their sexual orientation.

Oregon law bans discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people in jobs and in places that serve the public, such as restaurants and bakeries.

And the Bureau accurately applied the law – meaning it found against the Kleins.  (The ruling is 122 pages long, one of the longest anti-discrimination administrative orders I’ve ever encountered.)

The finding included an award of $135,000 in damages to the lesbian couple – which even some gay rights activists immediately said was overkill even if the finding against the Kleins was otherwise proper.

Except that it wasn’t.

Sure, there might be an amount at which one could say overkill had been reached – but $135,000 wasn’t it.

Why?

Laurel Bowman-Cryer filed a complaint in January 2013, but because she filed it online on her smartphone she was not shown the disclaimer informing her that the complaint, including her name and address, would be sent to the individual against whom it was being made. When Aaron Klein received the complaint, he immediately published it on his Facebook page in full, with Laurel’s name and address included.

That’s right, the Kleins doxxed the Bowman-Cryers.

The Bowman-Cryers weren’t awarded $135,000 only for the pain and suffering they experienced as a result of being refused service based on their sexual orientation but also as a result of the Kleins’ decision to dox them and then go on national media across the country. The media firestorm brought with it death threats, harassment, and the possibility of losing their children. The court found that the Bowman-Cryers suffered intensely, and that their suffering was a direct reaction of the Kleins’ actions both in refusing the cake and in keeping their refusal in the media.

Of course, aided and abetted, of course, by the usual right-wing suspects, the Kleins are portraying themselves as the victims.

We can’t let that narrative carry the day.