Was Barney Frank Ever Right About Anything?

From the Dec. 15, 1976 issue of The Advocate (page 8), please note the quote at the beginning of the paragraph halfway down the third column:

Advocate1976

For those who can’t make it out:

The bills will pass in ’77.
– St. Barney

For those not keeping score, Massachusetts did not pass a gay rights bill until 1989.  By then, St. Barney had been in Congress for eight years (though he was spending 1989 calling in every political favor, marker and chit he could unearth in order to avoid getting kicked out of Congress.  Google ‘Steven Gobie.’  Just sayin’….)

Thirty years after his declaration of what would happen in 1977 he bullied the LGBT community – trans people most pointedly – with what he *knew* was capable of passing and not passing.  And then he professed to know for certain that 15-20 more Democrats would make a legitimate (read: trans-inclusive) ENDA a sure thing.

Between the Massachusetts Legislature and Congress, St. Barney drew a legislative salary for forty years.

In all of that time, was he ever right about anything?

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If I Could Have the New York Daily News’s Baby, I Would

TrumpForBrains

Jake Tapper for the Slam Dunk

TapperSlam(We would also have accepted ‘Jake Tapper Slams the Skunk’)

 

No! No! A Million Times: NO!!!

DBMSHN

When Maryland finally went back and added trans people to its trans-genocidal 2001 gay-only rights law in 2014, Dana Beyer rewarded the gay sponsor of that 2014 bill, Rich Madaleno, with a primary challenge.

I had questioned Madeleno’s sincerity on trans issues a few years earlier, but he put that questioning to rest in 2014.  He deserved – and still deserves – the respect of the trans community for delivering something that his state’s viciously transphobic gay elite had stolen from trans people thirteen years earlier.  Sadly, he immediately had to deal with a Trans Jester whose raison d’être is, on the political evolutionary ladder, one rung removed from “Dilly, dilly!”

I leave it to you to surmise in which direction.

Beyer is a clown who has infected trans politics for far too long – and has only been able to do so because of wealth.  No one deserves to be rewarded with a Senate seat because of a penchant for wasting money on vanity political campaigns that, in the long run, have harmed the trans community. Dana Beyer is Harold Stassen without the political technicality of having actually once held office and Caitlyn Jenner without the technicality of having once been briefly legitimate enough to snag an Olympic gold medal.

Ten Years and Three Days After Black Wednesday

HRCMAGA
As someone remarked on Twitter a few minutes ago: “I hope you know that if I see a red hat like that I’m immediately put on edge.”

HRC and its marketers must be presumed to know.

And they must be presumed to not give a damn.

What Say You, #CaitlynWho?

Something told me to trademark the phrase “I Told You So” back when I saw the Gay, Inc. reaction to my publicizing the existence of the 1979 trans-inclusive Los Angeles Civil Rights Ordinance.

Woulda, coulda, shoulda….

President Trump announced on Wednesday that the United States will no longer “accept or allow” transgender people in the United States military, saying American forces “must be focused on decisive and overwhelming victory” and could not afford to accommodate them.

Yet, the military will continue to accommodate the delusions of people who believe in talking snakes, et. al.

But I digress…

Caitlyn?

That’s not his ear that you have.

And The Loser is the Fifth Doctor

In 1986 I hosted a “Caves of Androzani” party for the Texas A&M sci-fi group, MSC Cepheid Variable, when the local PBS station ran the episode (if I recall, I think I actually called it the “Peter Davison Death Party,” but I drank a lot back then.)

Some lamented the death of Peter Davison’s Doctor at the end. Many others, however, cheered.

A former Doctor Who actor has hit out at the BBC’s decision to cast Jodie Whittaker in the role, saying that the decision meant there is “a loss of a role model for boys”.

Peter Davison said she is a “terrific actress” but  that he has doubts that she is right for the role.

He said before an appearance at  at Comic-Con in San Diego: “If I feel any doubts, it’s the loss of a role model for boys who I think Doctor Who is vitally important for.”

We who cheered have been proven right.